Posted in Campgrounds, LIfestyle, RV Living, Travels

Around Pine Grove RV Park

After we left Lee’s Summit, Missouri, we headed north, past St. Joseph and the Iowa border, then turned west and wound our way to Greenwood, Nebraska.  Pine Grove RV Campground is a decent park, with gravelly old paved roads, lots of steep speed bumps, and gravel parking sites but no patio space, just grass and an old picnic table.  The grass was a bit hairy and tracked inside every time we took the dogs out.  The WiFi was weak, but they had an AT&T tower nearby to boost that signal.  We had full hook ups, but low water pressure, and a great view across a huge soybean field facing west.  This park has a small pool, shuffleboard and tennis courts, playground for kids, and, more importantly, fenced dog parks!  The corgis had a great time running free, barking just to bark, and getting much need exercise.  After the eclipse, we were happy to enjoy the evening sunsets out the front of the coach.


Barry had appointments east in Omaha on Tuesday and west in York on Wednesday…..so we really were working here!

I did enjoy the old cemetery at Trinity Lutheran Church during the eclipse on Monday.  My grandma used to like to walk around the cemetery in our town, checking all the graves to see if anyone had died that she had missed, looking to make sure Grandpa’s grave had fresh flowers, etc.  and I, also, like to walk around cemeteries.  This one is an old German cemetery with graves dating in the mid-to-late-1800’s.

I am related to the Schmidt family on my father’s side; my great-grandparents immigrated to the USA before my grandparents were born.  I like to check old cemeteries for any of the names in any of my family trees, and I found these graves, just not people in my tree!


We ran into Omaha and across the Missouri River to Council Bluffs, Iowa on Tuesday evening to the Bass Pro Shop there.  It is in a big casino complex at the intersection of I-80 and I-29 and had some public outcry and controversy when they built the overpass into the complex.


These pieces of “art” grace both sides of the overpass (2 on the North and 2 on the South), weigh 70,000 pounds, shoot 60′ into the sky, and cost an estimated $3,000,000 dollars.  They are titled “Odyssey” and were designed by renowned metal sculpture artist, Albert Paley.  We are familiar with his work from a piece at the entrance to the St. Louis Zoo; titled “Animals Always”, it is perfect for that site!  https://www.stlzoo.org/about/blog/2015/09/02/public-art-contributes-our-zoos-charm   These pieces, however, tower over the overpass and the highway in a crazy, Edward Scissorhands-like presence that is almost overwhelming.

The next day, Barry & I drove west to York, Nebraska to make a business call and I had such a wonderful day!  We stopped after the call in Lincoln to see the University of Nebraska stadium.

Memorial Stadium
Husker Nation!

After that stop, I dropped Barry off at the coach for a little exploring time on my own.  Now I had time to visit the Holy Family Shrine overlooking the Platte River valley.  It was modeled after Fay Jones’ Cooper Chapel in Arkansas as a place of meditation, reflection and prayer just off I-80, and stands as a welcoming refuge from the hustle and bustle of travel.

Visitors Center Entryway planted with so many wildflowers
Water is one of the major elements here and flows from the Visitor’s Center along a pathway and into the Chapel
Leaving the Visitor’s Center toward the Chapel
The Shrine is cool, quiet and reverent inside; the only sound is the water that runs under the stone floor up to the altar. The Holy Family is etched in the glass here.

Leaving the Shrine I took a different road back to the coach and found this funny lighthouse on the bank of the Platte River.

Combination of Lincoln & Omaha?

All in all, this is an interesting place to visit; big cities nearby, yet a rural setting for the campground.  We would probably stay here again when working in eastern Nebraska!

 

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