Posted in Campgrounds, LIfestyle, RV Living, Travels, Wildlife

Beatty, Nevada

Today we said goodbye to the incomparable beauty of Yosemite NP and headed south and east toward Las Vegas.  Snowy mountain tops along the Sierra Nevada said goodbye to summer and hello to fall (whaaat?) and we kept them in our view throughout most of today.

Not sad to leave the gas prices in Beatty!

The drive routed us east along a pass between the White Mountains and the Inyo Mountains and through miles and miles of dry, desert lands.  Beatty, Nevada, near the Sheep Mountain Range, was just far enough to give us a nice warmer overnight stop before heading further south to Las Vegas.   As we drove along, the landscape changed from pine forests to sage brush, then, after we left California and got further into Nevada, the Joshua Tree (a type of Yucca)  appeared.  They only grow in the Mohave and Sonoran Deserts in this part of the world!!!  That is awesome!

As we got closer to Beatty, we began to see burros along the highway.  They have wild burros in Nevada and Arizona!!!

This momma & her colt were just walking along the road!

We arrived in Beatty, turned at the only stoplight in town(!), and pulled into Death Valley Inn & RV Park.  It is about the only nice hotel here and looks decent from the front, with a pool and nice tree plantings.  The RV park is next door, all gravel with very small lacy trees planted along each site — and a view of the discarded old mattresses and furniture behind the hotel.  It is small, but has 50 amp FHU’s, decent shower house, and very clean laundry house; for only $35 a night, it was a nice stopover in the desert!

After freshly made lasagna and roll and cake (!) at the local diner, KC’s Outpost, we drove out to Death Valley NP.  I visited here many years ago with my family for a spring desert bloom, but Barry had never been here.  The eastern boundary was only 8 miles outside Beatty, past the ghost town of Rhyolite, along a long straight highway.

Long thin ribbon of highway between Death Valley and Beatty, NV
View from the eastern Kiosk entrance stop towards the lowest point in the USA – 282′ below sea level

This abandoned mine was just next to the road – and No! I did not go into it!

Tomorrow we drive a couple of hours to Las Vegas!  Our first “big” city in 2 months!!

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Posted in Campgrounds, Parks, Travels, Weather

Yosemite

We hugged Drew enough to hold us all until we could be together again and drove south and east from Lake Tahoe, back over Carson Pass and toward Gardnerville. It had snowed overnight in the upper elevations and left Carson Pass looking like the beginning of a great snow-boarding season!

Leaving snowy Tahoe!

We hoped to drive a few hours east and then due south to Lee Vining, California for a 2 night stay. Lee Vining is a tiny little town between the shores of Mono Lake and the Sierra Nevada Mountains, a “jump off” spot to Yosemite.  Mono Lake is an ancient saline lake that has no fish; instead it is home to trillions of Mono Lake Brine Shrimp and Mono Lake Alkali Flies. Freshwater streams feed Mono Lake, with forests of cottonwood and willow along their banks.

Mono Lake

We found Mono Lake RV Park and backed into our site. This is a small private park with less than 40 sites, but full hookups and 50 amps! Most of the other sites had coaches, 5th wheel’s and campers with vacationers, hunters and fishermen staying here. The town is small but had good places to eat and tourist-y shops with Native American goods. I think it would be hard to get a place to stay here in the summer as this town sits at the eastern entrance to Yosemite National Park.

Snow is coming to Mono Lake RV Park!!

After some wonderful star-gazing (the Milky Way was just perfect!) and a good night’s sleep, we awoke to freezing cold temperatures and snow above us in the mountains. We had hoped to spend the day in Yosemite, but the entrance was closed due to heavy snow in the mountains. The alternative would have been to drive back to Lake Tahoe, then drive south from there to the western Yosemite entrances, a journey of 8 hours…..so we waited. We had a good breakfast and drove about 2 miles toward the entrance to scope it out and found people parked along the roadside, waiting for word from the park rangers about opening the road.

Waiting to see if they open the Eastern Entrance to Yosemite!

I hiked a bit up a campground road there, found a running mountain stream and a grove of aspen, and returned to the road to wait also. About noon, a park ranger drove down from Yosemite and opened the gates!! We could go in, but had to watch the time and the weather, if it started to snow again, they would close this entrance and we would have no choice but to take the 8 hour journey back around to the RV.

Heavy snow at the upper elevations!
Fantastic rock face

Neither of us had ever been to Yosemite and had really no idea what to expect. We have seen the photos of El Capitan and Half Dome and Yosemite Falls, but this does not really prepare you for actually seeing it in person. We drove up over the mountains, following switchbacks that were just clinging to the side of mountains before the terrain changed completely. Tall pine trees with snowy branches filled the sky and then the ground became huge flat and rounded stone surfaces. It looked like a commercial for Jeep where they drive them out and off-road. After about 45 minutes, we dropped down and into Yosemite Valley. Seriously, I am not going to have enough adjectives to describe the valley, a canyon cut between mountains with a running river at the bottom and the road hugging the mountain all the way down.

Around a turn, Yosemite Falls came into view. It is tall and majestic and awe-inspiring, even at the end of summer when it was at its driest. There were lots of places to park and we stopped to admire that cascade of water from the mountain snows. This time of year the tourist season was not at its height and we were able to navigate the entire valley easily.

Lower Yosemite Falls
El Capitan
Two people are camping on a platform and then climbing during the day on El Capitan

A little further on we spotted El Capitan across the valley from Yosemite Falls. With my camera and long lens, I was able to photograph two people climbing from a sleeping platform about 1/3 of the way up. I personally could not climb a sheer mountain face or sleep on a board attached to it!! (Sadly, 2 days later, a 13 story size slab fell off the mountain face and several climbers were killed. I pray that the 2 we saw were not killed.). We wandered around Yosemite Village for a bit, bought a few souvenirs, grabbed a very expensive deli sandwich and headed back out of the Valley and toward Lee Vining.

Half Dome, in all it’s beauty, is on the right in this photo.

We stopped at the lookout for Half Dome on the way back and marveled at the beauty of this entire area. If you love history as we do, take some time to read about Yosemite and John Muir and his campaign to “save” Yosemite from development for the enjoyment of future generations. The National Park Service owes a huge debt to John Muir and President Teddy Roosevelt for the formation of that organization and the designation of Yosemite as one of America’s first National Parks.

As we exited the park gates and headed back to Lee Vining, we both agreed that Yosemite is definitely worth a 2 week stay on our next western trip! We said goodnight to the Milky Way and fell sound asleep dreaming about the wonders of Yosemite and planning our next visit!

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Posted in Campgrounds, Parks, RV Living, Travels, Wildlife

Bears in the Mountains!

We left Broken Bow and headed to Sydney, Nebraska to stay the night at the only Cabela’s campground anywhere!  Sydney was the site of the beginning of Cabela’s business, and they have a monster property there with a campground, horse corrals, and a store with everything!

 

Even the Corgis liked this spot!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next day we began the real drive across the prairie and headed toward Colorado!  If you have ever driven in snow country, then highway closures are nothing new to you; but to us, they serve as a reminder of the power of Mother Nature!  At most of the  exit ramps, were signs warning of the closure of the interstate ahead — Get Off The Highway Now kind of signs!

They even have gates to block the highway closed!

 

After miles and miles of prairie, we crossed into:


We continued on I-80 westward until we came to Cheyenne and headed south towards Fort Collins, Colorado to spend a few days near the Rocky Mountains!  Horsetooth Reservoir Campground is west of Fort Collins, nestled in the foothills of the Rockies and is a county park property.  We had 50 amp electrical service only at our dusty campsite, but had a lovely view of the reservoir and surrounding mountains outside the coach.  South Bay site #17 had big shady trees that helped keep the coach cooler in the hot summer heat, but none of the amenities — WiFi, cell service, water or sewer.  It did have frequent mule deer visitors though and delightful views of water, mountains and sky!


On the first day, while Barry worked, I took advantage of the proximity to the mountains and headed west toward Estes Park.  I had been this way once before, on a trip here with Barry & Tyler about 15 years ago and remembered the upward drive through Big Thompson Canyon and into Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP).  It is still a fantastic drive between narrow canyons and alongside the Big Thompson River, winding higher and higher into the mountains.  I was going to try out my back-packing skills for the first time, hiking at elevation with a loaded backpack; I left the highway and followed McGraw Ranch Road up and then down to Cow Creek Trailhead, just inside the boundary of RMNP.  I hoisted my pack on my back and headed off to test my skills on the North Boundary Trail.  After only hiking about 1/3 mile, I turned and retraced my steps back to my car, thoroughly disappointed with myself.  But I did learn!  I could do this, if I worked at acclimating to elevation without my backpack, I might be able to try again.

One side is the RMNP boundary, Comanche Peak Wilderness is on the other side!
The original McGraw Ranch house

I left this area and headed over to Estes Park to explore the little touristy town a bit.  It is the “end” of summer and lat-minute tourists and traffic crowded the town……..time to leave!


After leaving Estes Park to return down Big Thompson Canyon and back to Barry, I chanced to find a little pull-out park alongside the river, Sleepy Hollow Park, and stopped to see the water!   I love the sound and feel and smell of running mountain water and will take every possible chance to get close.  No other cars were parked in the small lot, the map marked trails nearby, a few picnic tables dotted the grassy area:  Perfect!!

​After I finished filming a video of the running water, I noticed some movement in the bushes at the turn of the river.  As I watched, a black bear and her two cubs popped out of the bushes and began working their way along the river toward me!!!  For the next 15 minutes, I watched the three of them move along the rocky areas above the river, looking for berries to eat along the way.  She kept an eye on me as I backed up to lean against a tree and stayed still as they scrambled along the rocks; I made sure the car was unlocked and I could make a speedy retreat, if necessary!

A small Black Bear sow
The smaller of the two cubs
This larger cub gave me a long stare before moving off behind the other two bears!

Too soon, they turned and made their way up the rocky incline and further away, I returned to my car and left, with a smile on my face from ear-to-ear!  I had seen bears in the wild!!!

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